Jones & Bartlett Learning Medicine Blog

    The 2017 Tarascon Pharmacopoeias Are Here!

    Posted by Lindsay White on Feb 3, 2017 10:48:51 AM

    Ask anyone at Tarascon, our favorite time of year is when we get to announce the new editions of the Tarascon Pharmacopoeias. The 2017 editions of the most popular and trusted source of portable drug information are here! The Tarascon Pharmacopoeia features new drugs that reflect the updated FDA Pregnancy and Lactation Labeling Rule (PLLR) and of course has been updated with the latest FDA Guidelines and new drug information.

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    Topics: medicine, Pharmacopoeia, prescribing, Tarascon, primary care, Physician, General Medicine, Pharma, pocketbook, primary care

    5-Star Review for Tarascon Primary Care Pocketbook

    Posted by Jennifer Sharp on Aug 21, 2015 4:39:15 PM

    We are excited to share that our Tarascon Primary Pocketbook has received 5 stars from Doody’s Review Service.

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    Topics: Doody's Review Service, medicine, primary care, Physician, esherick, resource, doctor, primary care

    Health Care and Technology Top List of 2015 Best Jobs

    Posted by Katie Hennessy on Jan 15, 2015 12:39:25 PM

    U.S. News & World Report has released their ranking of the 100 best jobs for 2015. Beginning with the occupations that the U.S. Department of Labor Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts will grow the most between 2012 and 2022, the list ranks jobs in a variety of industries based on projected openings, rate of growth, job prospects, unemployment rates, salary, and job satisfaction.

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    Topics: registered nurse, nurse practitioner, Physician, US News, General Medicine, dentist

    Now Available: 2015 Tarascon Interactive Catalog

    Posted by Jennifer Sharp on Dec 1, 2014 12:57:53 AM

    The interactive version of the 2015 Tarascon Catalog is now available.

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    Topics: Catalog, mobile medicine, oncology, Pharmacopoeia, Tarascon, primary care, Physician, discount, General Medicine, Pharma, Prescribing, resource, Global Health Blog, Hospital Medicine Blog, Infectious Disease

    Smart Pill Helps Doctors Monitor From Within

    Posted by Jennifer Sharp on Jun 26, 2013 11:41:18 PM

     

    Proteus Digital Health is creating medicines with mobile technology to make healthcare more accessible, manageable and innovative for patient and provider. In July 2012, the FDA approved Proteus Digital Health's microchip, an ingestible pill containing a tiny sensor that can communicate, via their Digital Health Feedback System, vital information about medication-taking behaviors and how the patient's body is responding.
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    Topics: mobile medicine, oncology, FDA, medication, primary care, Physician, CorTemp, doctors, General Medicine, HQ Inc, mobile medicine, pill, Prescribing, Proteus, Pyschiatry & Mental Health, Cardiology, Hospital Medicine Blog

    Simulation-Based Procedural Training Improves Job & Patient Satisfaction

    Posted by Joseph Esherick on Feb 29, 2012 5:33:55 PM

    Dr. Joseph Esherick Monthly Blog – February 2012

    Are you a hospitalist who would like to incorporate procedures into your practice but don’t feel competent or confident in your skills?  Are you a hospitalist who does procedures so infrequently that you feel more comfortable referring your patients to a specialist for such procedures?  Are you a hospitalist who believes that you can get better reimbursement seeing more inpatients rather than incorporating hospital procedures into your practice?  Are you a hospitalist who believes that doing procedures will decrease your job satisfaction?  These are a few of many scenarios and myths that prevent hospitalists from performing bedside procedures.

    Hospitalists who perform procedures enjoy their jobs more than those who do not.   In one Canadian study of over 19,000 physicians, the degree of job satisfaction was directly linked to the range of procedures performed by the physician.[1]

    Additionally, patients feel better when the bedside procedures are performed by their primary physician with whom they have developed a rapport.  There are a few reasons for this.  Frequently, procedures performed by a specialist, especially an interventional radiologist, require that the patient has long waits, is taken away from their room, their nurse, and their family.  Furthermore, patients have often developed a relationship and trust with their primary inpatient physician and feel more comfort when they are performing the procedure rather than a complete stranger.

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    Topics: primary care, Physician, American Board of Internal Medicine, Dr. Joseph Esherick, simulation-based training, American College of Physicians, bedside procedures, Hospital Medicine Blog, hospital medicine, hospitalist, patient, point-of-care, Society of Hospital Medicine, surgical skills

    Do Resident Work Hour Restrictions Improve Either Patient Safety or Postgraduate Medical Education?

    Posted by Joseph Esherick on Sep 28, 2011 8:10:01 AM

    Dr. Joseph Esherick Monthly Blog – September 2011

    National resident work hour restrictions were first implemented by the ACGME in 2003.   The debate started initially after the unfortunate death of Libby Zion in 1984 which prompted the state of New York to restrict resident duty hours.   The assumption was that resident fatigue caused the death of Libby Zion.  Among other restrictions, the 2003 regulations restricted resident shifts longer than 30 hours.  The regulations also stipulated that resident physicians must have at least one day in seven off and must have a 10 hour break between work shifts.

    In 2008, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) declared that resident duty hour restrictions must be tighter to reduce medical errors and improve resident education.  The IOM proclaimed that resident shifts should not exceed 16 hours unless they are interrupted by a five-hour uninterrupted nap, no shift should exceed 30 hours, and moonlighting hours are counted as a part of the 80-hour weekly maximum.  Based on these recommendations, the ACGME has imposed new 2010 regulations that prohibit first-year residents from working shifts longer than 16 hours, senior residents must work shifts no longer than 24 hours, and shifts must be separated by a 10 hour break.  The assumption that has been made is that these duty hour restrictions will decrease resident fatigue and therefore lead to improved patient safety and improved resident education, which will eventually lead to better graduating physicians.

    The reality, however, is these residency duty hour restrictions have led to neither improved patient outcomes nor improved resident education.  The data suggest that the IOMs assumptions are wrong... 

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    Topics: Institute of Medicine, Physician, ACGME, Authors, medical educaction, resident, work hour restrictions, Hospital Medicine Blog, Joesph Esherick, Libby Zion

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