Jones & Bartlett Learning Medicine Blog

    Recently Published: 100 Questions & Answers About Schizophrenia

    Posted by Lindsay White on Jul 21, 2016 10:38:40 AM

    Schizophrenia and its related conditions are all too common among young adults and are prevalent in about 1% of the general population. This is a devastating disorder of thinking; if gone undetected and thus untreated it can lead to robbing an individual of his or her life's goals and aspirations as it develops. If unchecked, it can lead to either suicidal or violent behavior towards others because the affected individual may become plagued by increasing paranoia, bothersome auditory hallucinations commanding various actions, and a general withdrawal from reality. Lately some unfortunate cases of developing schizophrenia have made the news because of the tragic and deadly events they initiated. These have spurred controversial gun control debates and have brought mental illness to the forefront of these debates about government legislation nationally.

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    Topics: education, awareness, medicine, patient education, mental health, General Medicine, Authors, Pyschiatry & Mental Health, patient education

    Asking Questions, Getting Answers from Kidney Cancer (Renal Cell Carcinoma) Experts—Helping patients be informed and empowered partners in their care.

    Posted by jadef on Jun 29, 2015 3:42:36 PM

    The National Cancer Institute places kidney cancer among the most common cancers in the United States. The American Cancer Society’s estimates that there will be over 61,000 new cases of kidney cancer each year. Kidney cancer strikes both men and women. The kidneys function as the main filters in the human body, which makes kidney cancer relatively unresponsive to traditional chemotherapy.

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    Topics: Authors

    Jones & Bartlett Learning Title Featured on Grammy Award Website

    Posted by Jennifer Sharp on Oct 30, 2013 7:46:33 PM

    Studies have shown that music therapy supports cancer patients through their treatment. It has been proven to promote wellness, manage stress, alleviate pain, enhance memory, help patients communicate and express feelings, and even promote physical rehabilitation.

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    Topics: oncology, patient education, grammy, grammy.com, Authors, laurel fishman, music, Music and Cancer: A Prescription for Healing, Nimesh P Nagarsheth, Reviews, MD

    Review: "useful in providing essential information to students and residents"

    Posted by Jennifer Sharp on Sep 25, 2013 4:00:03 AM

    Doody’s Review Service recently reviewed the Tarascon Neurosurgery Pockebook  by Melanie G. Hayden Gephart, MD, MAS. According to reviewer, Ramsis  Farid Ghaly, MD, FACS (Ghaly Neurosurgical Associates), “is useful in providing essential information to students and residents.”

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    Topics: Doody's Review Service, medical students, doctors, Authors, neuro, tarascon neurosurgery pocketbook, Reviews, medical residents, Melanie G. Hayden Gephart MD MAS, neurosurgery

    New From JBL: The Jones & Bartlett Author's Corner

    Posted by Jennifer Sharp on May 17, 2013 12:00:46 PM

    Jones & Bartlett is pleased to announce the launch of  the Jones & Bartlett Learning Author’s Corner, a resource for prospective and new authors. The site contains the most up-to-date, general information on art development, manuscript submission, the publishing process, and editorial contacts. It also houses pertinent documents including: author information forms, marketing questionnaires, and proposal guidelines.

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    Topics: allied health, education, health, Author, Contest, Jones & Bartlett, medicine, oncology, patient education, primary care, General Medicine, Authors, Prescribing, publication, Pyschiatry & Mental Health, Cardiology, Global Health Blog, Hospital Medicine Blog, Infectious Disease, text

    Tarascon Title Is A Best Seller On Amazon

    Posted by Jennifer Sharp on Mar 25, 2013 6:41:06 PM

    Major internet retailer Amazon.com offers best seller lists as a way of identifying titles which are popular and frequently purchased by their customers. We are proud to announce that the Tarascon Palliative Medicine Pocketbook was listed as the #1 best seller under the Physician & Patient Hospice Care eBooks category last week.

    The Tarascon Palliative Medicine Pocketbook is the only shirt pocket-sized, quick reference for guiding those difficult conversations with patients and family members who require palliative and hospice care. Containing communication skill techniques, prognostication tools, symptom management options and ethical issues, this portable guide is an ideal tool for any member of the Palliative Medicine team, including: physicians, nurses, social workers, chaplains, pharmacists and more.

    What people are saying about the guide:

    "This point is very helpful for a quick look up of info and new treatment considerations for PC." - Amazon customer review

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    Topics: physicians, Amazon, medicine, oncology, Tarascon, oncology, Geriatric, Pharmacists, chaplains, Ethical Decision-making, General Medicine, grief, Authors, social workers, Hospital Medicine Blog, end of life, hospice, palliative, Prognostication

    Celebrating NYU Cancer Institute’s New Research System

    Posted by admin on Sep 5, 2012 12:46:43 PM

    Re-posted from Yahoo News:

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    Topics: oncology, patient education, cardiothoracic surgery, Authors, metabolic disease, NanoString Technologies, nCounter Analysis System, NYU Langone Medical Center, NYU School of Medicine, Belluck & Fox, Cancer Institute, Cardiology, Dr. Harvey Pass, Infectious Disease, infectious disease, patient education

    Perioperative Statin Therapy Reduces Perioperative Cardiac Events and Hospital Length of Stay

    Posted by Joseph Esherick on Aug 28, 2012 9:47:52 AM

    Perioperative statin therapy has long been felt to confer cardiac protection during both cardiac surgery and major noncardiac surgery.  Until recently the data have been scarce to definitively make claims in support of this belief.  In 2004, Durazzo et al. conducted the first randomized trial examining the use of Perioperative statins in major noncardiac surgery.  They compared the use of atorvastatin 20 mg daily compared against placebo initiated 2 weeks prior to elective major vascular surgery and continued for 45 days post-operatively.  The investigators found that statins were associated with a 70% relative risk reduction of the combined end-point of death, nonfatal MI, unstable angina, or stroke. [1] Prior to this in 1999, Christenson had demonstrated cardioprotective effects of statins during coronary artery bypass grafting surgery. [2]

    Statins are thought to be beneficial for a myriad reasons:

    • They lower lipids and have additional pleiotropic effects.
    • The cardioprotective effects of statins during the perioperative period is more likely related to their pleiotropic effects than their lipid-lowering effects.
    • Statins inhibit the action of HMG-CoA Reductase which is the rate-limiting step in cholesterol synthesis, but effective lipid lowering takes months.
    • Perioperative studies have demonstrated that statins confer a cardioprotective benefit when started even 1-2 weeks in advance of major surgery.
    • These pleiotropic effects of statins include suppression of endothelial nitric oxide which promotes coronary vasodilation.
    • Statins also reduce lipopolysaccharide-induced tissue factor release, decrease plasminogen activator inhibitor levels, and increase tissue plasminogen activator; the combination of which reduces coronary thrombosis.
    • Statins also have anti-inflammatory properties which may provide more plaque stability. [3]
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    Topics: Stroke, cardiac surgery, cholesterol, Dr. Joseph Esherick, Authors, MI, atorvastatin, atrial fibrillation, beta-blockers, bypass grafting surgery, Cardiology, cardioprotective, coronary artery, Hospital Medicine Blog, lipids, myonecrosis, statin therapy, unstable angina

    The Dangers of Acid Suppressive Therapy

    Posted by Joseph Esherick on Jul 18, 2012 10:02:33 AM

    Acid suppression has long been associated with an increased risk of developing Clostridium difficile infection (CDI), having recurrent Clostridium difficile infection, and now has been shown to increase the complication rate and mortality from Clostridium difficile infection.  This risk applies to both H2-blockers and proton pump inhibitors (PPI), but the risk appears to be significantly higher for proton pump inhibitors.

    Several prior studies and meta-analyses have demonstrated an increased risk of Clostridium difficile infection with proton pump inhibitor therapy.[1,2,3]    Howell et al. performed a case-cohort study investigating over 101,000 patient discharges at a tertiary medical care center over a five-year period.  They discovered a three-fold increased incidence of nosocomial CDI in patients receiving daily PPI therapy compared with controls not receiving any acid suppression therapy.  The risk of CDI was two-fold in patients receiving daily H2-blocker therapy and 4.5-fold increased risk for patients receiving twice daily PPI therapy.[1]  The meta-analysis performed by Deshpande et al. reviewed 30 observational studies between 1990 and 2010 and concluded that PPI therapy is associated with a two-fold increased the risk for CDI.[3]

    In addition, we know that PPI use increases the risk of recurrent CDI.  A retrospective, cohort study by Linsky et al. analyzed 1166 inpatients at a single center over a five year period and determined that use of PPI within 14 days of CDI diagnosis increased the rate of recurrent CDI after appropriate treatment by 42% compared with those patients not receiving PPI therapy.[4]

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    Topics: acid suppressive therapy, cephalosporins, clindamycin, fluoroquinolones, H2-blockers, hospital-acquired pneumonia, Authors, peptic ulcer disease, Acid suppression, and intravenous vancomycin, antibiotics, Beta-lactamase inhibitor combination antibiotics, carbapenems, CDI, chronic gastroesophageal reflux disease, Clostridium difficile infection, community-acquired pneumonia, Hospital Medicine Blog, PPI, proton pump inhibitors

    Botswana and Human Resources for Health - Part 2

    Posted by admin on May 14, 2012 10:49:57 AM

    This is the follow-up blog post from Tarascon Publishing Author, Matthew Dasco, MD, MSc.  Click here to read Part 1 of the Botswana and Human Resources for Health post.

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    Topics: Global health, Africa, Fogarty International Center, health workers, Authors, Matthew Dasco MD, Medical Education Partnership Initiative, MEPI, Ministry of Health, National Institute of Health (NIH), University of Botswana School of Medicine, US Health Resources and Services Organization, Botswana, Global Health Blog

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