Jones & Bartlett Learning Medicine Blog

    Just Published: Tarascon Pocket Pharmacopoeia 2014 Classic Shirt Pocket Edition

    Posted by Jennifer Sharp on Nov 19, 2013 12:27:24 AM

    Used by prescribers around the world, including physicians, pharmacists, nurses, physician assistants, dentists, and medical transcriptionists, the Tarascon Pocket Pharmacopoeia® 2014 Classic Shirt-Pocket Edition continues its tradition as the leading portable drug reference packed with vital drug information to help clinicians make better decisions at the point of care.

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    Topics: Pharmacopoeia, Pharmacy, Tarascon, primary care, General Medicine, Pharma, Prescribing, resident, doctor, Hospital Medicine Blog, just published, medical student

    November is American Diabetes Month

    Posted by Jennifer Sharp on Nov 1, 2013 1:14:10 AM

    November marks the annual observance of American Diabetes Month (ADM). Spearheaded by the American Diabetes Association, ADM is a time to raise awareness of diabetes, a metabolic disease in which the body’s inability to produce any or enough insulin causes elevated levels of glucose in the blood.

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    Topics: patient education, Tarascon, American Diabetes Association, endocrinology, General Medicine, insulin, american diabetes month, diabetes, Hospital Medicine Blog, patient education

    September is Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month

    Posted by Jennifer Sharp on Sep 12, 2013 3:53:33 PM

    Cancer of the ovary (ovarian cancer) is the ninth most common cancer in women in the U.S. with almost 22,000 women newly diagnosed each year. Ovarian cancer is the fifth leading cause of cancer deaths in women. In 2013, approximately 14,230 women will die in the United States from ovarian cancer.

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    Topics: oncology, oncology, General Medicine, gynecologic cancer, oncology resources, ovarian cancer awareness month, Hospital Medicine Blog, ovarian cancer, women's cancer

    Tarascon Medical Procedures Pocketbook Now Available As An App

    Posted by Jennifer Sharp on Jul 30, 2013 5:17:04 PM

    The Tarascon Medical Procedures Pocketbook, a reference Doody's Review Service awarded 5 stars, has now been released as a mobile application for your Apple, Android and BlackBerry devices.

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    Topics: Google Play, iTunes, mobile medicine, Tarascon, primary care, esherick, General Medicine, mobile applications for doctors, mobile medicine, Tarascon Medical Procedures Pocketbook, blackberry world, Hospital Medicine Blog, medical procedures, mhealth

    ACE Inhibitors May Slow Dementia Deterioration

    Posted by Jennifer Sharp on Jul 26, 2013 4:30:27 AM

    Patients taking drugs known as ACE inhibitors, used to treat high blood pressure, showed slower rates of cognitive decline caused by certain types of dementia, according to a study published by BMJ Open.

    The researchers analyzed 361 patients, with an average age of 77, who had been diagnosed with either Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, or a mixture of both. Of these patients, 85 were already  taking ACE inhibitors; the rest were not.

    Each of the patient's cognitive decline was assessed using one of two standardized mental state examinations on two separate occasions, six months apart. The researchers also analyzed the impact of ACE inhibitors on the brain power of 30 patients newly prescribed these drugs, during their first six months of treatment.

    Compared with those not taking ACE inhibitors, those on these drugs experienced marginally slower rates of cognitive decline - researchers found a small, but significant, difference in patients who undertook the more sensitivities of the two tests. The study also revealed that the brain power actually improved for 30 new prescribed patients during their first six months of treatment.

    This authors suggest that this may be because newly prescribed patients stuck to their medication regimen better, or a by-product of better blood pressure control, or improved blood flow to the brain. But it is the first time that there has been any evidence to suggest that blood pressure lowering drugs may not only halt cognitive decline, but may actually improve brain power.

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    Topics: medicine, primary care, ace inhibitors, alzheimer's, General Medicine, Pharma, research study, dementia, Hospital Medicine Blog, high blood pressure

    Smart Pill Helps Doctors Monitor From Within

    Posted by Jennifer Sharp on Jun 26, 2013 11:41:18 PM

     

    Proteus Digital Health is creating medicines with mobile technology to make healthcare more accessible, manageable and innovative for patient and provider. In July 2012, the FDA approved Proteus Digital Health's microchip, an ingestible pill containing a tiny sensor that can communicate, via their Digital Health Feedback System, vital information about medication-taking behaviors and how the patient's body is responding.
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    Topics: mobile medicine, oncology, FDA, medication, primary care, Physician, CorTemp, doctors, General Medicine, HQ Inc, mobile medicine, pill, Prescribing, Proteus, Pyschiatry & Mental Health, Cardiology, Hospital Medicine Blog

    New From JBL: The Jones & Bartlett Author's Corner

    Posted by Jennifer Sharp on May 17, 2013 12:00:46 PM

    Jones & Bartlett is pleased to announce the launch of  the Jones & Bartlett Learning Author’s Corner, a resource for prospective and new authors. The site contains the most up-to-date, general information on art development, manuscript submission, the publishing process, and editorial contacts. It also houses pertinent documents including: author information forms, marketing questionnaires, and proposal guidelines.

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    Topics: allied health, education, health, Author, Contest, Jones & Bartlett, medicine, oncology, patient education, primary care, General Medicine, Authors, Prescribing, publication, Pyschiatry & Mental Health, Cardiology, Global Health Blog, Hospital Medicine Blog, Infectious Disease, text

    Tarascon Title Is A Best Seller On Amazon

    Posted by Jennifer Sharp on Mar 25, 2013 6:41:06 PM

    Major internet retailer Amazon.com offers best seller lists as a way of identifying titles which are popular and frequently purchased by their customers. We are proud to announce that the Tarascon Palliative Medicine Pocketbook was listed as the #1 best seller under the Physician & Patient Hospice Care eBooks category last week.

    The Tarascon Palliative Medicine Pocketbook is the only shirt pocket-sized, quick reference for guiding those difficult conversations with patients and family members who require palliative and hospice care. Containing communication skill techniques, prognostication tools, symptom management options and ethical issues, this portable guide is an ideal tool for any member of the Palliative Medicine team, including: physicians, nurses, social workers, chaplains, pharmacists and more.

    What people are saying about the guide:

    "This point is very helpful for a quick look up of info and new treatment considerations for PC." - Amazon customer review

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    Topics: physicians, Amazon, medicine, oncology, Tarascon, oncology, Geriatric, Pharmacists, chaplains, Ethical Decision-making, General Medicine, grief, Authors, social workers, Hospital Medicine Blog, end of life, hospice, palliative, Prognostication

    Better Than Google: New Search Engine Helps Doctors Diagnose Rare Diseases

    Posted by Jennifer Sharp on Mar 20, 2013 11:48:51 AM

    Rare diseases are notoriously difficult to diagnose.  According to the FDA, one-third of people with a rare disease will wait one to five years before receiving a correct diagnosis. A new search engine created by researchers at the Technical University of Denmark, FindZebra, is aiming to change that.

    "Zebra" is a medical slang term for a surprising diagnosis. The term derives from the aphorism "When you hear hoofbeats behind you, don't expect to see a zebra", which was coined by a professor at the University of Maryland School of Medicine to describe unexpected diagnoses. This term is widely used in medical communities, and refers to diseases occurring in less than 1 in 2000 of the population.

    The FindZebra website states that it aims to "[address] the task of searching for relevant rare diseases given a query of patient data. The patient data is given as free text, which means that the queries do not have to use a controlled vocabulary or specific query language restrictions as in conventional diagnostic assistance systems. The patient data submitted as a query to the information retrieval (IR) system could consist of patient age, gender, demographic information, symptoms, evidence of diseases, test results, previous diagnoses, and other information that a clinician might find relevant in the differential diagnosis."

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    Topics: physicians, patient education, Diagnosis, findzebra, General Medicine, rare disease, Technical University of Denmark, zebras, Hospital Medicine Blog, hospital medicine, patient education, search engine for rare disease

    Perioperative Statin Therapy Reduces Perioperative Cardiac Events and Hospital Length of Stay

    Posted by Joseph Esherick on Aug 28, 2012 9:47:52 AM

    Perioperative statin therapy has long been felt to confer cardiac protection during both cardiac surgery and major noncardiac surgery.  Until recently the data have been scarce to definitively make claims in support of this belief.  In 2004, Durazzo et al. conducted the first randomized trial examining the use of Perioperative statins in major noncardiac surgery.  They compared the use of atorvastatin 20 mg daily compared against placebo initiated 2 weeks prior to elective major vascular surgery and continued for 45 days post-operatively.  The investigators found that statins were associated with a 70% relative risk reduction of the combined end-point of death, nonfatal MI, unstable angina, or stroke. [1] Prior to this in 1999, Christenson had demonstrated cardioprotective effects of statins during coronary artery bypass grafting surgery. [2]

    Statins are thought to be beneficial for a myriad reasons:

    • They lower lipids and have additional pleiotropic effects.
    • The cardioprotective effects of statins during the perioperative period is more likely related to their pleiotropic effects than their lipid-lowering effects.
    • Statins inhibit the action of HMG-CoA Reductase which is the rate-limiting step in cholesterol synthesis, but effective lipid lowering takes months.
    • Perioperative studies have demonstrated that statins confer a cardioprotective benefit when started even 1-2 weeks in advance of major surgery.
    • These pleiotropic effects of statins include suppression of endothelial nitric oxide which promotes coronary vasodilation.
    • Statins also reduce lipopolysaccharide-induced tissue factor release, decrease plasminogen activator inhibitor levels, and increase tissue plasminogen activator; the combination of which reduces coronary thrombosis.
    • Statins also have anti-inflammatory properties which may provide more plaque stability. [3]
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    Topics: Stroke, cardiac surgery, cholesterol, Dr. Joseph Esherick, Authors, MI, atorvastatin, atrial fibrillation, beta-blockers, bypass grafting surgery, Cardiology, cardioprotective, coronary artery, Hospital Medicine Blog, lipids, myonecrosis, statin therapy, unstable angina

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