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    National Cholesterol Awareness Month

    Posted by admin on Sep 13, 2011 9:57:36 AM

    September marks the annual observance of National Cholesterol Awareness Month.

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    Topics: patient education, cholesterol, National Lipid Association (NLA), atherosclerosis, Cardiology, heart disease, national cholesterol awareness month, patient education

    August is National Immunization Awareness Month

    Posted by admin on Aug 17, 2011 11:28:43 AM

    With students getting ready to go back to school, and the upcoming flu season fast approaching, August marks the annual observance of National Immunization Awareness Month (NIAM).

    The goal of NIAM is to increase awareness about immunizations, and to reach the thousands of people in the U.S.  and the hundreds of thousands around the world who go unprotected from vaccine-preventable diseases that claim the lives of countless people each year. It has been proven that the best defense against contracting common viruses and diseases is for both children and adults to be immunized. In addition, a healthier population reduces healthcare costs, and results in fewer missed work and school days.

    5 Key Reasons to Support Immunization Programs:

    1. Immunization Saves Lives
    Immunization saves more than 3 million lives worldwide each year, and it saves millions more from suffering illness and lifelong disability.

    Global distribution of the 1.4 million annual deaths caused by vaccine-preventable (WHO)
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    Topics: influenza, National Immunization Awareness Month, NIAM, vaccine, immunization, Infectious Disease, infectious disease

    Capgras Syndrome: Ever Thought Your Loved One Was an Impostor?

    Posted by admin on Jul 11, 2011 12:38:48 PM

    Reposted from Huffington Post:
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/carol-w-berman-md/capgras-syndrome_b_888854.html
    article by Jones & Bartlett Learning Medicine Author, Carol W. Berman, MD

    ++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

    Did you ever look at your husband or wife and feel that person is an impostor? Janet, a 24-year-old graduate student, came home from a stressful day at school and found a man she thought was a stranger in her bed.

    "Who are you? How did you get into my apartment?" she asked.

    She was in no mood to fool around with a strange man who had somehow gained entrance to her apartment and was lounging on her bed in her husband's blue silk pajamas.

    "Very funny. And who are you?"

    The man countered. He looked similar to Dave, her husband. In fact, he had short brown hair, dark blue eyes and the same kind of round cheeks as Dave. However, Janet knew in her gut that it wasn't Dave. Maybe distant relatives or casual friends might believe the man was Dave, but Janet and Dave had been together practically every day for the last three years, and Janet could swear it wasn't her husband.

    As a psychiatrist I treat many bizarre conditions, but this case was one of the strangest. The movie "Invasion of the Body Snatchers," in which people correctly accuse their loved ones of being impostors, illustrates Capgras' syndrome. In the movie, the townspeople's loved ones were actually replaced by extraterrestrials who want to destroy humanity. In Capgras' syndrome, people falsely believe their loved ones are replaced by duplicates.

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    Topics: psychiatry, Capgras Syndrome, Carol W. Berman, Authors, Panic Disorder, psychiatrist, Pyschiatry & Mental Health, MD, NYU Medical Center

    Pre-Procedural Statins Reduce the Incidence of Peri-procedural Cardiac Events

    Posted by admin on May 20, 2011 2:07:07 PM

    Dr. Joseph Esherick Monthly Blog - May 2011

    Initiation of statins during the acute period has been shown to be beneficial during an acute coronary syndrome and immediately following an ischemic stroke. [1,2,3] It is believed that statins, HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, have pleiotropic properties that have anti-inflammatory effects, improve endothelial function and inhibit the body’s thrombogenic response.  The properties are in addition to the lipid lowering effects of statins.  These pleiotropic effects are felt to be the principal mechanism by which statins decrease recurrent cardiovascular and cerebrovascular events when started acutely during an acute coronary syndrome or immediately after an ischemic stroke.  Statins have also been shown in two randomized controlled trials to decrease the incidence of peri-procedural myocardial infarction if started soon before percutaneous coronary intervention or before major vascular surgery. [4,5]

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    Topics: Cardiac Events, Authors, Statins, Cardiology, cardiology, Hospital Medicine Blog

    Treatment & Management of Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Posted by admin on Apr 25, 2011 1:15:24 PM

    Dr. Joseph Esherick Monthly Blog - April 2011

    The leading cause of death in the United States is cardiovascular mortality.  Therefore, the early identification and appropriate management of acute coronary syndrome is essential for all hospital-based physicians.  The American College of Cardiology Foundation and the American Heart Association have recently updated their practice guidelines on the management of patients with unstable angina (UA) and non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI)1.

    This blog will focus on the primary changes in the management of non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome.  The Level 1 recommendations are that patients with definite UA/NSTEMI at medium to high risk should receive 325 mg of aspirin and a second antiplatelet agent on presentation.  Dual antiplatelets should be given regardless of whether an invasive or conservative strategy is chosen.  The second antiplatelet agent could be either a loading dose of clopidogrel, prasugrel, or a GP IIb/IIIa inhibitor (preferably eptifibatide or tirofiban).  The major change in the recommendations is that dual antiplatelet therapy is now routinely recommended upstream of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).  In patients undergoing PCI, both aspirin and a thienopyridine, clopidogrel or prasugrel, should be continued for at least 12 months.  For those treated conservatively, dual antiplatelet therapy should continue for at least 1 month and ideally for 1 year.

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    Topics: medication, American Heart Association, American college of cardiology, Cardiology, cardiology, Hospital Medicine Blog

    Lillie Shockney Featured in Breast Cancer Wellness Journal

    Posted by admin on Apr 15, 2011 6:26:41 AM

    Jones & Bartlett Learning Author profile for Lillie Shockney, RN, BS, MAS in this month's Breast Cancer Wellness Journal

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    Topics: oncology, patient education, Authors

    Fall Prevention in Hospitalized Elderly Patients

    Posted by admin on Mar 17, 2011 1:21:54 PM

    Dr. Joseph Esherick Monthly Blog - March 2011

    Falls are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in elderly Americans.  One out of three people age 65 years and older fall each year.[1] These falls led to 2.2 million emergency department visits and 581,000 hospitalizations in 2009.  Twenty to thirty percent of falls in older adults lead to serious injuries,[2] including hip fractures and traumatic brain injuries.  Falls are also the leading cause of injury-related death in adults age 65 years and older in the United States.  The end result of these unintentional falls is an annual cost to the United States of over $19 billion.[3]

    These are the statistics for community-dwelling elderly Americans.  We also know that hospitalization increases a person’s fall risk primarily because of acute illness, residence in an unfamiliar environment, connection to multiple tubes and monitors, and an increased risk of delirium.[4] A serious fall can also create a fear in falling for elderly adults; this fear in falling initiates a progressive slide towards reduced mobility, leading to progressive loss of function and, therefore, an increased risk of falls.[5] For this reason, it is of paramount importance to put systems in place to prevent falls in our older adults.

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    Topics: elderly, fall prevention, Hospital Medicine Blog, hospitalization, patient education

    Hepatitis C Vaccine on the Horizon

    Posted by admin on Mar 7, 2011 12:28:10 PM

    A new vaccine being developed by a team of researchers from the University of Copenhagen in Denmark may reduce the number of positive hepatitis C tests in the future. They are reporting one of the first successful trials in inoculating animals against the disease.

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects at least 170 million people worldwide and about 4 million people in the United States. It is a big public health problem because most acute hepatitis C infections become chronic which can lead to further liver problems like cirrhosis and cancer.

    "The hepatitis C virus (HCV) has the same infection pathways as HIV," says Jan Pravsgaard Christensen, Associate Professor of Infection Immunology at the Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Copenhagen.

    "Approximately one newly infected patient in five has an immune system capable of defeating an acute HCV infection in the first six months. But most cases do not present any symptoms at all and the virus becomes a chronic infection of the liver."

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    Topics: research, Prescribing, vaccine, hepatitis, immunization, Infectious Disease

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