Jones & Bartlett Learning Health Blog

    Multiple Opposition Contrast Intervention by author Carol Koch

    Posted by Carol Koch on May 17, 2019 10:08:19 AM

    Children with speech sound disorders comprise a large portion of caseloads for speech-language pathologists working with pre-school and school-age children.  Selecting the most appropriate approach in order to yield the maximum change in the child’s phonological system is important to achieve optimal outcomes.  Due to the importance and scope of the topic, I am constantly fielding the question, ‘How do I determine targets for the multiple opposition contrast approach?’ I hope my response below can be of use to you if you are encountering the same problem.

    Children with phonological disorders often present challenges to SLPs in determining the most effective and efficient intervention approach, including the targets that will best facilitate significant progress. For some children, the loss of phonemic contrasts represents the core of the phonological disorder. Loss of phonemic contrasts is evident when production errors impact the intended meaning of a word, phrase or sentence. For example, a child may say [ti] for “tea”, but also for “key” and “see”. The words are produced as homonyms and the phonemes [k] and [s] are not use contrastively to create the different meanings represented in the words “key” and “see”.

    Children who demonstrate extensive loss of contrast may produce one phoneme for many target phonemes. A collapse of phonemes is identified when a child produces one sound across several different target sounds, thus representing loss of the contrasts needed to create different words. The phoneme identified as the substitution for the target phoneme can also be referred to as the preferred phoneme. For example, an extensive collapse might be represented in a child that substitutes [b] for [d, k, g, m, n, s, l, r, ʃ, ʧ, j, h]. Thus, the targets of do, coo, goo, moo, new, Sue, loo, roo, shoe, chew, you, and who are all produced as boo. The phoneme [b] is the preferred phoneme. This extensive collapse of contrast results in extensive homonymy. Rather than attempt to develop a list of target words for this extensive collapse, phonemes are selected from the error phonemes to represent different phoneme classes. A key feature of the contrast approaches is to promote generalization across sound classes, thus each individual phoneme in the collapse does not need to be targeted. Further examination of the significant collapse where the child substitutes the preferred phoneme [b] for [d, k, g, m, n, s, l, r, ʃ, ʧ, j, h], the collapse represents multiple errors related to the following phoneme classes:
    stops [d, k, g],
    nasals [m, n],
    fricatives [s, ʃ, h],
    liquids [l, r],
    glides [j], and
    affricates [ʧ].

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    Topics: speech-language pathology, SLP, phonological disorder, carol koch

    Coming Soon: Fundamentals of Audiology for the Speech-Language Pathologist, Second Edition

    Posted by Alianna Ortu on Mar 31, 2017 11:30:57 AM

    Fundamentals of Audiology for the Speech-Language Pathologist, Second Edition is specifically written for the speech-language pathologist working with hearing impaired populations. This accessible text incorporates the expertise of audiologists along with the knowledge and experience of speech-language pathologists. 

    SECOND EDITION UPDATES
    • NEW chapter on Audiological Diagnoses, Etiologies, and Treatment Considerations
    • NEW chapter on Audiological Screening, including instructions for young children and difficult to test populations

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    Topics: allied health, New Edition, fundamentals of audiology, speech-language pathology, ukstins, audiology, Communication Sciences and Disorders, SLP, Speech Language Hearing, welling

    2017 Communication Sciences & Disorders Catalog

    Posted by Alianna Ortu on Mar 7, 2017 2:57:15 PM

    See what's new in Communication Sciences & Disorders

    View the 2017 Catalog 

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    Topics: allied health, New Edition, Catalog, new edition, speech-language pathology, allied health, audiology, Communication Sciences and Disorders, CSD, SLP, Speech Language Hearing

    A Need for More Interprofessional Education in Speech-Language/Hearing Programs

    Posted by Alianna Ortu on Nov 21, 2016 10:01:47 AM

    There’s no question that speech-language pathologists and audiologists collaborate with a number of counterparts when working to treat their patients. They work together in schools with teachers, parents, and administrators to create and implement treatment plans for their clients. In hospitals and private facilities, they work together with staff, physicians, nurses, occupational therapists, and many others. In fact, it’s rare when a healthcare professional works alone with a patient. Why is this? One reason is growing evidence showing that interprofessional practice (IPP) is linked to improved patient outcomes, which is a top priority of any health professional.

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    Topics: allied health, speech-language pathology, weiss, audiology, CSD, interprofessional care, interprofessional teams, ipe, SLP

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