Jones & Bartlett Learning Health Blog

    Just Published: Introduction to Diagnostic Microbiology for the Laboratory Sciences

    Posted by Tory Jones on Mar 21, 2014 11:15:59 AM

    As an aspiring medical laboratory technician, Introduction to Diagnostic Microbiology for the Laboratory Sciences is the all-in-one resource necessary for you to develop a foundation in microbiology.  A must-have text for students as well as a helpful reference for practitioners, it reviews the microorganisms most commonly encountered in clinical settings and clearly explains basic laboratory procedures.

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    Topics: allied health, Health, microbiology, health administration, Health Administration, health professionals, Health Professions, Health Science, New Text, New text, Laboratory Sciences, allied health professional, Diagnostic Microbiology

    Just Published: Concepts in Sterile Preparations and Aseptic Technique

    Posted by Tory Jones on Mar 19, 2014 11:57:10 AM

    Concepts in Sterile Preparations and Aseptic Technique examines the current standards and best practices for sterile compounding, and the fundamentals of aseptic technique in an accessible manner to pharmacy and pharmacy technician students as well as to professionals.

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    Topics: allied health, Health, health administration, health professionals, Health Professions, New Text, Pharmacy, Pharmacy Technician, Medication, Pharmaceutical sciences

    Just Published: Guide to Evidence-Based Physical Therapist Practice, Third Edition

    Posted by Tory Jones on Mar 14, 2014 8:52:29 AM

    The number 1 evidence-based practice textbook for Physical Therapists and students has been updated to a new edition!

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    Topics: allied health, Health, New Edition, evidence-based practice, health professionals, Health Professions, New Text, physical therapy, new edition, Personal Health, physical therapist, physical therapy, allied health professional, Evidence-Based Medicine

    Just Published: Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Sciences with Patient Care Correlations

    Posted by Tory Jones on Mar 11, 2014 11:27:15 AM

    Cell biology, medicinal chemistry, immunology and microbiology are just a few of the many areas of science that pharmacy students need a solid foundation in in order to succeed in their education and career. Biomedical and Pharmaceutical Sciences with Patient Care Correlations offers a comprehensive yet introductory overview of 16 biomedical and pharmaceutical sciences to allow students to develop a strong foundational understanding of these complex subjects.

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    Topics: allied health, cell biology, Health, microbiology, health professionals, Health Professions, Health Science, New Text, Pharmacy, Medication, medicinal chemistry, Pharmaceutical sciences, toxicology, biostatistics, drug information, immunology

    Employability: If You Don’t A.S.K., You Don’t G.E.T

    Posted by sharonb on May 6, 2013 3:00:31 AM

    When we speak to students about careers in health care management, we often talk about the perfect storm we now have of demand for services and the retirement of baby boomers, leaving our health care system with a void of skilled workers. In many of these conversations, we are so enthusiastic about the market and availability of jobs, we have a tendency to overlook the obvious: the field needs well-prepared graduates who are employable.

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    Topics: administration, health administration, Health Administration, health care management, health professionals, Sharon B. Buchbinder, Sharon Buchbinder Blog, Skills-based health education, employability

    Special Author Event: Dr. Patti Rose at Books & Books in Coral Gables, FL

    Posted by Katie Hennessy on Oct 4, 2012 3:09:02 PM

    Are you going to be in the Coral Gables, FL area next week? Would you like to meet Jones & Bartlett Learning author Dr. Patti Rose, MPH, EdD, and learn more about her new book, Cultural Competency for the Health Professional? Stop by Books & Books on Wednesday, October 10, 2012 at 6:30pm for a special author event.

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    Topics: allied health, Author, cultural nuances, health professionals, Health Professions, allied health professional, Books & Books, Patti Rose

    Writing Competencies: Whose Responsibility Is It?

    Posted by sharonb on Jul 2, 2012 3:00:36 AM

    Over the past two decades, one of the oft repeated complaints  from colleagues is that our students don't know how to write. Here are some explanations I've heard.

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    Topics: administration, Author, Health Administration, health care management, health professionals, Sharon B. Buchbinder, writing competencies

    New Cultural Competency Text Features an Interview with Former HHS Secretary

    Posted by Katie Hennessy on Jun 15, 2012 1:59:57 PM

    Jones & Bartlett Learning recently published Cultural Competency for the Health Professional by Patti R. Rose, MPH, EdD. Included in the text is an interview with Dr. Donna Shalala, current President of the University of Miami and former Clinton U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS).

    Cultural Competency for the Health Professional reviews the importance of the implementation of cultural competency by allied health professionals, and the process of assessment, training, and evaluation. It includes a clear and concise overview of the necessary tools to apply cultural competency processes as well as systematic and disciplined approaches to the process of achieving it. Also addressed are the reservations that may exist in various health professions with interests in moving in the direction of cultural competency, such as associated costs and limited time. Cultural Competency for the Health Professional provides health professions students with key cultural competency information and practical insight into how to apply this knowledge in their day-to-day work environments as they deal with patients on a clinical basis.

    Chapter 10 includes an interview between the author and Dr. Shalala. Read an excerpt,

    Dr. Rose: In general, what is your perspective regarding healthcare reform given the rapidly changing demographics in the U.S.?
    Dr. Shalala: I don’t think there is a lot of reform in health care reform. What I do think is that it is a substantial increase in coverage. We’re going to get close to most Americans having health insurance. So this bill is very much about coverage. So the people who don’t currently have coverage are working class. That involves large numbers of minorities, African Americans and Hispanics in particular, who tend to work hourly and often more than one part time job but they are working. So 80% of the people who don’t have health insurance at this moment in time are working or they are families of the workers.
    Dr. Rose: So essentially what you are saying is the fact that our demographics are changing. This new concept has emerged-- emerging majorities rather than minorities--in fact the term minorities might become obsolete.
    Dr. Shalala: That’s absolutely true.  So that means that health care has to change along with it. Both who provides the healthcare and how they provide it.

    Interested in learning more? Visit our website today.

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    Topics: allied health, HHS, cultural nuances, health professionals, Health Professions, New Text, patient diversity, shalala, allied health professional, Patti Rose

    Teamwork in Online Courses: How Can We Encourage Effective Participation?

    Posted by sharonb on May 7, 2012 3:00:50 AM

    Why does the thought of teamwork assignments make entire classes of students and professors cringe? Despite years of research and numerous articles emphasizing the need for teamwork experiences in higher education, few instructors have been formally educated in methods to teach teamwork. There are even fewer courses devoted exclusively to teamwork, despite some excellent texts (Freshman, Rubino, & Chassiakos, 2009). Many of us stumble along, and, if we are lucky, find mentors who have years of experience in classroom teamwork assignments. I was fortunate to have colleagues who believed in the need for teamwork for our discipline, even when many other faculty members found it too frustrating to deal with.

    We shouldn't wait until people are in post-graduate programs to introduce them to applied teamwork (Nash, 2008; Newell, 1990). That road leads to disappointment. Habits of doing everything alone have been instilled and teaching teamwork must undo many of these "I can do it all" or "I should do it all" attitudes. Teamwork education must begin at the undergraduate level and continue through graduate school and beyond (Drake, Goldsmith, & Strachan, 2006; Lerner, Magrane, & Friedman, 2009). Once employed, our graduates will be judged by their supervisors and colleagues on their ability to be team players. In healthcare, lives literally depend on good teamwork (Sehgal, Fox, Vidyarthi, Sharpe, Gearhart, Bookwalter, Baker, Aldredge, Blegen, & Wachter, 2008).

    So, how can instructors encourage effective teamwork participation in the online environment? Here are some tried and true methods I have used you can apply to your courses.

    • Post a syllabus that explicitly addresses the value of teamwork and the rubrics by which students will be judged. Students want and deserve to know what they need to do to achieve their educational goals in a course. The proportion of their grade for the course related to teamwork should be meaningful. One to five percent of a course grade is not adequate to motivate students to actively engage in teamwork. A bare minimum of ten percent of the course grade should be assigned to the team projects. In addition, for teamwork, they should be judged by their peers, not only by the instructor. There are a number of teamwork rubrics; I happen to like the one I created with my colleagues (Buchbinder, Cox & Casciani, 2012, p. 374). The tool addresses key criteria for successful team players, including: attendance, preparation, collaboration and goal identification, active participation, open-mindedness and willingness to modify opinions, concise presentation of ideas, timely submission of assignments, respectful and considerate interactions with teammates, fulfillment of responsibilities and active work on achievement of group consensus. Used as an Excel file, students can easily total up the scores. Students are required to explain why they gave a teammate a score of under 3 or over 8 on a scale of 1 to 10.  They must also indicate whether they would work with this person again (Yes/No) (Buchbinder, Cox & Casciani, 2012, p. 374).
    • Establish ground rules for netiquette. Most universities have guidelines for student civility and for respectful online interaction with instructors and peers. Place these guidelines in your syllabus and separately in your online course, and make a point of referring students to these documents. If a student behaves inappropriately later on, he or she cannot claim ignorance.
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    Topics: administration, author, health administration, Health Administration, health care management, health professionals, Online Learning, Sharon B. Buchbinder, teamwork, Health care, Sharon Buchbinder Blog

    Audio Program Nov 17th: WIHI & Health Literacy with Helen Osborne

    Posted by admin on Nov 11, 2011 7:55:12 AM

    Be sure to catch the next WIHI Audio Program
    Thurs, Nov 17, 2011, 2:00PM – 3:00PM ET
    Health Literacy: New Skills for Health Professionals

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    Topics: New Edition, Author, Health literacy, health professionals, Public health management, Skills-based health education, WIHI, audio, Osborne

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