Jones & Bartlett Learning Health Blog

    Why Should We Study the Health Care Systems of Other Nations?

    Posted by Sophie Teague on Aug 30, 2017 1:18:00 PM

    By James A. Johnson, PhD, MPA, MSc
    Author of Comparative Health Systems, 2nd Edition

    Students in the U.S. and in many other countries as well, too often have a limited view of health care and population health, many times failing to see beyond their own borders. This is especially so when we consider the myriad health systems that emerged in the widest range of cultures and social contexts imaginable. Each of the countries of the world has a responsibility to its citizens and residents to provide for health and well-being. Some take this responsibility seriously and others do not. Some have severe resource constraints and others do not. Given the diversity of socio-political circumstances and variations in culture and history, we now see many variations.

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    Topics: Health Administration, Health care

    Developing Future Health Care Leaders

    Posted by Alianna Ortu on Feb 13, 2017 10:00:18 AM

    Regardless of his/her official title, it is imperative in today's health care environment that every professional posses the skills and abilities needed to be an effective leader. Developing future health care leaders requires introducing students to key leadership principles, applications and constructs.

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    Topics: allied health, Health care, Leadership, ledlow, health care leadership

    Big Brother Is Watching

    Posted by sharonb on Apr 6, 2015 3:00:14 AM

    Last month, I talked about job searches from the other side of the desk, that of the candidate and how to help students avoid going into a house of horrors. In this post, I will be talking about something we don’t read a lot about in healthcare settings, but I anticipate we will be hearing more, that is employer surveillance and monitoring of employees.

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    Topics: health administration, Health Administration, Sharon B. Buchbinder, Health care, Sharon Buchbinder Blog

    Jones & Bartlett Learning Author John D. Davies Publishes Respiratory Care Article

    Posted by Tory Jones on Jun 20, 2014 10:20:21 AM

    John D. Davies, the author of Chapter 19: Airway Management in Respiratory Care: Principles and Practice, Second Edition, just published a great article in the June issue of RESPIRATORY CARE.

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    Topics: allied health, Health, Health Professions, Respiratory Care, Health care, Respiratory Care, Airway Management, Health Professional, John D. Davies

    A New High-tech Health Care Education Center Prepares Students for Careers

    Posted by Tory Jones on Jun 6, 2014 10:38:06 AM

    In January, Northern Essex Community College opened El-Hefni Allied Health & Technology Center in Lawrence to help health care students learn by simulating life-like health care and emergency situations.

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    Topics: allied health, education, health, health professionals, Health Professions, learning, Health care, simulated learning, technology center, allied health

    2014 Best Jobs in the US

    Posted by Tory Jones on Apr 2, 2014 1:17:02 PM

    US News & World Report just released their list of the Best Jobs of 2014, and 40 of the top 100 picks are health care jobs. Among other criteria, US News selected and ranked these jobs based on the number of expected openings, advancement opportunities, career fulfillment and salary expectations.

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    Topics: allied health, Health, registered nurse, respiratory therapist, health administration, health professionals, Health Professions, Health Science, nurse practitioner, Pharmacy, physical therapy, Medication, Health care, National Health, Personal Health, Pharmaceutical sciences, Physical Therapist Assistant, Respiratory Care, allied health professional, Careers, Health Care Industry, Occupational Therapist, Pharmacist, Physician, Speech-Language Pathologist

    Teamwork in Online Courses: How Can We Encourage Effective Participation?

    Posted by sharonb on May 7, 2012 3:00:50 AM

    Why does the thought of teamwork assignments make entire classes of students and professors cringe? Despite years of research and numerous articles emphasizing the need for teamwork experiences in higher education, few instructors have been formally educated in methods to teach teamwork. There are even fewer courses devoted exclusively to teamwork, despite some excellent texts (Freshman, Rubino, & Chassiakos, 2009). Many of us stumble along, and, if we are lucky, find mentors who have years of experience in classroom teamwork assignments. I was fortunate to have colleagues who believed in the need for teamwork for our discipline, even when many other faculty members found it too frustrating to deal with.

    We shouldn't wait until people are in post-graduate programs to introduce them to applied teamwork (Nash, 2008; Newell, 1990). That road leads to disappointment. Habits of doing everything alone have been instilled and teaching teamwork must undo many of these "I can do it all" or "I should do it all" attitudes. Teamwork education must begin at the undergraduate level and continue through graduate school and beyond (Drake, Goldsmith, & Strachan, 2006; Lerner, Magrane, & Friedman, 2009). Once employed, our graduates will be judged by their supervisors and colleagues on their ability to be team players. In healthcare, lives literally depend on good teamwork (Sehgal, Fox, Vidyarthi, Sharpe, Gearhart, Bookwalter, Baker, Aldredge, Blegen, & Wachter, 2008).

    So, how can instructors encourage effective teamwork participation in the online environment? Here are some tried and true methods I have used you can apply to your courses.

    • Post a syllabus that explicitly addresses the value of teamwork and the rubrics by which students will be judged. Students want and deserve to know what they need to do to achieve their educational goals in a course. The proportion of their grade for the course related to teamwork should be meaningful. One to five percent of a course grade is not adequate to motivate students to actively engage in teamwork. A bare minimum of ten percent of the course grade should be assigned to the team projects. In addition, for teamwork, they should be judged by their peers, not only by the instructor. There are a number of teamwork rubrics; I happen to like the one I created with my colleagues (Buchbinder, Cox & Casciani, 2012, p. 374). The tool addresses key criteria for successful team players, including: attendance, preparation, collaboration and goal identification, active participation, open-mindedness and willingness to modify opinions, concise presentation of ideas, timely submission of assignments, respectful and considerate interactions with teammates, fulfillment of responsibilities and active work on achievement of group consensus. Used as an Excel file, students can easily total up the scores. Students are required to explain why they gave a teammate a score of under 3 or over 8 on a scale of 1 to 10.  They must also indicate whether they would work with this person again (Yes/No) (Buchbinder, Cox & Casciani, 2012, p. 374).
    • Establish ground rules for netiquette. Most universities have guidelines for student civility and for respectful online interaction with instructors and peers. Place these guidelines in your syllabus and separately in your online course, and make a point of referring students to these documents. If a student behaves inappropriately later on, he or she cannot claim ignorance.
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    Topics: administration, author, health administration, Health Administration, health care management, health professionals, Online Learning, Sharon B. Buchbinder, teamwork, Health care, Sharon Buchbinder Blog

    Thoughts from Joel Teitelbaum on Health Reform and the Supreme Court

    Posted by Joel Teitelbaum on Apr 10, 2012 3:25:54 PM

    In this first of a four-part series on the health reform case before the Supreme Court, Jones & Bartlett Learning author and health policy expert Joel Teitelbaum weighs in on the topic of the Anti-Injunction Act.

    During the final week of March, the United States Supreme Court engaged in an historic debate about the meaning and constitutionality of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (known as Affordable Care Act, or ACA).  The debate was historic for several reasons: its content, focused as it was on perhaps the most sweeping health law in the nation’s history, and certainly of the past 50 years; its precedential importance, given that the Court is poised to make potentially enormous changes to Congress’s Commerce and Spending Clause powers; and its length, with oral arguments spanning a record three days.

    The Court agreed in November 2011 to hear oral arguments on a series of legal issues that arose as a result of nearly 30 legal challenges to the ACA since its passage in March 2010.

    The four issues the Court agreed to consider are:

    1. Whether the ACA’s individual coverage requirement (also referred to as the individual mandate) is a tax for purposes of the Anti-Injunction Act.
    2. Whether Congress has the power under Article I of the Constitution to enact the minimum coverage requirement.
    3. Whether, if the coverage requirement is found unconstitutional, it is “severable” from the remainder of the ACA.
    4. Whether the ACA’s requirement that states expand Medicaid eligibility or risk losing federal funds is unduly coercive in violation of the Tenth Amendment.

    In this blog post, the first of a four-part series, I focus on the first question.  The next post will focus on questions two and three, and the third blog post will discuss the question concerning the Medicaid expansion.  In the final blog post, I will describe the Court’s eventual ruling in the case, which is expected by the end of June (when the current Supreme Court Term ends).

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    Topics: ACA, Affordable Care Act, Author, Congress, health policy, Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, Supreme Court, Law, Health care, law, AIA, Anti-Injunction Act, Health Reform, Policies, Supreme Court Health Reform Decision, taxes

    New Edition of Best-Selling Health Policy Textbook Examines Health Care Reform & More

    Posted by admin on Mar 13, 2012 11:05:59 AM

    Below is the preface for the highly anticipated Second Edition of Essentials of Health Policy and Law, by Joel B. Teitelbaum, JD, LLM and Sara E. Wilensky, JD, PhD from School of Public Health and Health Services, George Washington University.

    Essentials of Health Policy and Law, Second Edition will be publishing April 1, 2012.  Visit us to request your complimentary review copy today.

    Essentials of Health Policy and Law, Second Edition

    Health policy and law are matters of national and local focus and concern.  Public opinion polls, media coverage, and policy debates at all levels of government and in private industry attest to the important place that health care and public health hold in the minds of the American public, policymakers, and lawmakers.  The constant attention showered on health policy-related topics also highlights their complexity, which stems from multiple factors.

    First, like most challenging public policy problems, pressing health policy questions simultaneously implicate politics, law, ethics, and social mores, all of which come with their own set of competing interests and advocates.  Second, health policy debates often involve deeply personal matters pertaining to one’s quality—or very definition—of life, philosophical questions about whether health care should be a market commodity or a social good, or profound questions about how to appropriately balance population welfare with closely guarded individual freedoms and liberties.  Third, it is often not abundantly clear how to begin tackling a particular health policy problem.  For example, is it one best handled by the medical care system, the public health system, or both?  Which level of government—federal or state—has the authority or ability to take action?  Should the problem be handled legislatively or through regulatory channels?  The final ingredient that makes health policy problems such a complex stew is the rapid developments often experienced in the areas of health care research, medical technology, and public health threats.  Generally speaking, this kind of rapid evolution is a confounding problem for the usually slow-moving American policy- and lawmaking machinery.

    Broadly defined, the goal of health policy is to promote and protect the health of individuals and of populations bound by common circumstances.  Because the legal system provides the formal structure through which public policy—including health policy—is debated, effectuated, and interpreted, law is an indispensable component of the study of health policy.  Indeed, law is inherent to the expression of public policy: major changes to policies often demand the creation, amendment, or rescission of laws.  As such, students studying policy must learn about the law, legal process, and legal concepts.  The range of topics fairly included under the banner of “health policy and law” is breathtaking.  For example, what effect is health care spending having on national and state economies?  How should finite financial resources be allocated between health care and public health?  How can we ensure that the trust funds established to account for Medicare’s income and disbursements remain solvent in the future as an enormous group of Baby Boomers becomes eligible for program benefits?  What kind of return (in terms of quality of individual care and the overall health of the population) should we expect from the staggering amount of money we collectively spend on health?  Should individuals have a legal entitlement to health insurance?  How best to attack extant health disparities based on race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status?  What policies will best protect the privacy of personal health information in an increasingly electronic medical system?  Can advanced information technology systems improve the quality of individual and population health?  Should the right to have an abortion continue to be protected under the federal Constitution?  Should physician assistance in dying be promoted as a laudable social value?  Will mapping the human genome lead to discrimination based on underlying health status?  How prepared is the country for natural and man-made catastrophes, like pandemic influenza or bioterrorism attacks?  What effect will chronic diseases, such as diabetes and obesity-related conditions, have on health care delivery and financing?  How best to harness advancing scientific findings for the benefit of the public’s health?

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    Topics: public health education, Author, health policy, Public Health, Health care, George Washington University, Joel B. Teitelbaum, Public health management, Sara E. Wilensky, Essentials of Health Policy and Law, public opinion, School of Public Health and Health Services

    Can We Tame Wicked Problems In Health Care?

    Posted by admin on Sep 9, 2009 11:30:34 AM

    One of the things that the maelstrom of controversy over healthcare reform has underscored, yet again, is that there are no easy buttons in health care. Many scholars and pundits have weighed in on this issue with the pros and cons of why we should or should not change how we finance and deliver health care in this country. I won’t be adding to that discussion. I will, however, pose a different question:  Can we tame wicked problems in health care?

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    Topics: public health education, health administration, Public Health, Sharon B. Buchbinder, transdisciplinary, Health care, Public health management, Sharon Buchbinder Blog, preventive medicine, wicked problems

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