Jones & Bartlett Learning Health Blog

    Author Recognition - Eric Shamus & Arie J. van Duijn

    Posted by Alianna Ortu on Mar 2, 2017 11:30:30 AM

    We are pleased to share that Jones & Bartlett Learning authors Eric Shamus, PT, DPT, PhD and Arie J. van Duijn, PT, EdD, OCS have been chosen as the 43rd honorees of the Florida Gulf Coast University Author Series. Each month, one textbook written or contributed by an FGCU faculty member is selected for recognition. In March 2017, they will recognize Manual Therapy of the Extremities.

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    Topics: allied health, Author, author, physical therapy, manual therapy, physical therapy, shamus, PT, van duijn

    Vaccinations and Health Care Managers

    Posted by sharonb on Feb 2, 2015 3:00:19 AM

    With the return of Ebola to center stage in world health and the much heralded and anticipated start of vaccine trials for this disease in West Africa, it is easy to forget old diseases and debates. Vaccinations created by man, not by natural disease processes, have historically engendered controversy. According to Link (2005, p. 38), "vaccines are counterintuitive. What sense does it make to inject a well baby with a potent, biologically active vaccine that contains elements of the very disease it is supposed to prevent?"

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    Topics: administration, Author, author, health administration, Health Administration, health care management, Sharon B. Buchbinder, Sharon Buchbinder Blog, vaccinations

    Never Say No

    Posted by sharonb on Apr 7, 2014 4:00:27 AM

    As part of the capstone experience in our graduate program, students are required to interview a minimum of three executives or healthcare managers using a structured interview format  published in Career Opportunities in Health Care Management. At the completion of the interview, the student identifies and indicates the healthcare management leadership competencies the executive noted during the interview and the competencies needed to conduct the interview.  In addition, the student reflects upon what insights the interview provided about his or her own career development and continuing education plans.

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    Topics: administration, author, health administration, Health Administration, health care management, Sharon B. Buchbinder, Sharon Buchbinder Blog

    Teaching About Violence in Healthcare Settings

    Posted by sharonb on Feb 3, 2014 12:00:28 AM

    Almost daily, it seems the media is filled with reports of violence, so much so that we almost become numb to them. An active shooter in a popular mall. A disgruntled employee returns to his former place of employment armed to kill. A student with mental health problems murders a favorite teacher, a classroom full of students, or goes on a campus rampage. However, when violence hits in healthcare settings, we are shocked and ask, How did this happen? These institutions, these sacred places, are supposed to serve and care for our loved ones. Yet in many instances they cannot protect our loved ones because of the nature of the settings themselves. As the incidence of violence rises, we are doing a disservice to our students by not talking about this elephant in the room, violence in health care settings. The purpose of this blog is to provide a brief overview of violence in healthcare settings, raise your awareness of this phenomenon, and encourage faculty to include it in their courses and curriculum.

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    Topics: administration, Author, author, health administration, Sharon Buchbinder Blog, Violence in healthcare settings

    Developing Reflective Practitioners

    Posted by sharonb on Nov 3, 2013 11:30:16 PM

    Upon graduation, health care management students are expected to be confident, competent, reflective practitioners. We are also expected to provide data to support our assertion that we have accomplished this feat. Measurements of confidence can be obtained through student self-assessments. Assessments of competencies can be conducted via course work and face to face observations.  What is a "reflective practitioner" and is this something we can objectively assess and document?

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    Topics: administration, author, health administration, Health Administration, health care management, Sharon B. Buchbinder, Reflective practitioners, Sharon Buchbinder Blog

    Got Rubrics?

    Posted by sharonb on Oct 8, 2013 8:00:46 AM

    As an educator and a professional writer, one of my hobby horses is writing competencies. I wrote about this in a previous blog and asked whose responsibility it is. Over a year later, in online forums and collegial discussions, the debate continues. Is the real issue that "our students can't write" or that "we shouldn't have to be English teachers?" It doesn't matter either way. Our accrediting organizations and our discipline demand effective communication skills, including writing.

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    Topics: administration, author, health administration, Health Administration, health care management, Sharon B. Buchbinder, Rubrics, Sharon Buchbinder Blog

    21st Century Global Mental Health: Intersecting with Scientific Debates and Global Mental Health Policy

    Posted by Cassie Peterson on Jun 3, 2013 3:04:46 PM

    Written by Eliot Sorel, MD – Author of 21st Century Global Mental Health

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    Topics: Author, author, Global health, American Psychiatric Association, DSM5, The World Health Organization, Eliot Sorel, Eliot Sorel Blog

    Discussion Boards: How Can We Improve Them?

    Posted by sharonb on Apr 1, 2013 3:00:05 AM

    If you teach in a fully online or a hybrid class, you know the Discussion Board, Forum, or Threads, whatever name they go by, are considered the "heart" of the online classroom. At least that's what these vehicles for asynchronous discussions are supposed to be. When used properly, online discussions can be the epicenter of intellectual challenges and interactions between the students and the instructor. Participants can used their higher order thinking skills (HOTS), actively engage in the material, and be pushed to the next level of their career development. Or, in less exhilarating instances, students parrot back material from the text (sometimes not bothering to put in quotes), respond to the minimal number of other students, per the syllabus, and check off another item on their to do list to get through the course.

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    Topics: administration, Author, author, health administration, Health Administration, health care management, Sharon B. Buchbinder, Sharon Buchbinder Blog, Case studies

    This is Your Brain on Fiction: Why Teaching with Case Studies Works

    Posted by sharonb on Sep 4, 2012 3:00:52 AM

    A health care management case study is a short story depicting an organizational scenario which can be non-fiction or fiction. As in all short stories, it should have a beginning, middle, and an end. And it should also engage readers’ higher order thinking skills (HOTS). The case study method is an example, par excellence, of problem-based learning (PBL), an educational approach that engages the student and provides opportunities for deeper learning. The purpose of this blog post is to provide an overview of the HOTs, the attributes of a good case study, the neuroscience of why case studies are effective, and to offer some tips on selecting and writing good case studies.

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    Topics: administration, Author, author, health administration, Health Administration, health care management, Sharon B. Buchbinder, Problem Based Learning, Sharon Buchbinder Blog, Case studies, Higher Order Thinking Skills

    A Plague of Plagiarism

    Posted by sharonb on Jun 4, 2012 3:00:29 AM

    Technology has brought us many wonders, among which are iPhones, iPads, and online education. Born into an era of these constantly evolving gadgets, is it any surprise that Generation Y has a culture of sharing everything? They share music, videos, jokes, and status updates, including check-ins and bad break-ups. Texting has given rise to a new language, so much so that a glossary of abbreviations is required for parents to understand what their kids are saying to each other. Gross (2011) sees plagiarism as a cultural issue of this generation that loves to share.

    As educators, it has become more challenging for us to teach students proper business language and appropriate boundaries. Perhaps the most challenging of these boundaries for us to teach is not to fabricate materials or appropriate other people's work and present it as their own. Is it really their fault that they have difficulty with this concept? What are they seeing in the news? Here are but a few examples.

    • A college dean discovered his work plagiarized by academics (Fish, 2010)

    • Mitch Albon, author of Tuesdays with Morrie, fabricated material for a sports column (Mediamythbusters, n.d.)

    • Doris Kearns Goodwin, historian, paid an author for using large portions of his book without attribution (Kearns, 2009).

    What were the consequences for these people? In some instances, they were terminated from their jobs. In others, the consequences were a little public humiliation, and they continued about their lives.

    My work was plagiarized by two college professors who submitted a paper to a prestigious journal. Unfortunately for them, I was one of the reviewers. They used a five-hundred word published abstract of mine verbatim, in its entirety, without any attribution. When I discovered the theft, I had to document and prove it was my work. What were their consequences? I have no idea. The authors were blinded to me and the journal editor never told me. If journalists, authors and academics struggle with the notion of not stealing someone else's intellectual property, why are we so shocked and angry when it occurs in our classrooms, be they face to face or online?

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    Topics: administration, Author, author, health administration, Health Administration, health care management, Sharon B. Buchbinder, plagiarism, Sharon Buchbinder Blog

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