Princeton Review Names Two Jones & Bartlett Learning Science Authors as Top Undergraduate Professors

The Princeton Review (www.PrincetonReview.com) – one of the nation’s best-known education services companies – has teamed up with RateMyProfessors.com – the highest-trafficked college professor ratings site in the U.S. – to create the first comprehensive guidebook to America’s top undergraduate professors.

Jones & Bartlett Learning is thrilled to announce that the Princeton Review chose two of our very own authors to receive this extraordinary recognition; John Knox, co-author of Meteorology, Third Edition and Paul R. Pinet, author of Invitation to Oceanography, now in its 6th edition.

John KnoxJohn Knox, associate professor of Geography at University of Georgia, teaches a number of classes, including Introduction to Weather and Climate and Introduction to Physical Geography, and his aim is to make his classes interactive and enjoyable for his students. Students say that Knox is passionate about his teaching and tries to fully engage them in the learning process.  Last year, Knox and co-author Steven Ackerman published the third edition of their popular text, Meteorology, which incorporates this teaching philosophy and draws students into the learning processes with web-based activities and assessments integrated throughout each chapter.

Paul Pinet, professor of Geology and Environmental Studies at Colgate University, has a goal to “instill passion for life-long, self-motivated learning, pondering the questions that have no answers and yet lead to ever deeper queries, to ever greater humility.” In the classroom, where he teaches Introductory Oceanography, among other courses, he enables students to immerse themselves in the ideas presented in such a way that they begin to understand their potential as self-learners.  This teaching style shines through within the pages of Invitation to Oceanography, where critical thinking activities are interwoven through the text and its student resources.

Knox and Pinet started out as two names among 42,000. From there, the Princeton Review culled the list to 1,000. After gaining input from school administrators, students and surveys of professors under consideration, editors cut the list down to their final 300, which represent 122 college and universities.

 The Best 300 Professors, which is the first comprehensive guidebook to America’s top undergraduate professors, is unusual in that it started based on data collected from undergraduate students. It relies heavily on the opinions they give about the professors they learn from daily.

 For more information and complete lists of the book’s professors, see
www.princetonreview.com/best-professors.aspx.

This entry was posted in Author, Biology, New Edition, Online Learning, Science, Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Comments are closed.